Better Preventive and Curative Health Care

India's health indicators are not improving as fast as other socio-economic indicators. Good healthcare is perceived to be either unavailable or unaffordable. How can we improve healthcare conditions, both curative and preventive, especially relating to women and children?

Sign In
How can we improve both the health and the care of expecting mothers?

How to ensure that the most vulnerable groups are included with health, women and child care interventions?

Postby chanana.ak@nic.in » Mon Feb 07, 2011 8:15 am

How to ensure that the most vulnerable groups are included with health, women and child care interventions?
chanana.ak@nic.in
 
Posts: 145
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2010 11:37 am
Has Liked: 0 time
Have Like: 23 times

Re: How to ensure that the most vulnerable groups are included with health, women and child care interventions?

Postby josephmhspl@gmail.com » Mon Feb 07, 2011 3:54 pm

It would be nice if we can avoid using unhealty products/lifestyle to become a healthy society.. In India we use many of banned(in many developed countries) fertilizers, construction material, drugs, and other pollutants.. Endosulphan and Asbestos are just 2 of them.. mobile phones too make a lot of pollution by way of frequency and non users too are getting the problems of that. The impact or quantum of damage given by mobile network is yet to be evaluated . A tax on total usage of mobile phone may be charged and used for health care. This tax could make mobiles expencive compared to landline phones and usage of the land phones would be improved compared to unhealthy mobile phones..
josephmhspl@gmail.com
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2011 3:20 pm
Has Liked: 0 time
Have Like: 0 time

Re: How to ensure that the most vulnerable groups are included with health, women and child care interventions?

Postby harsh267@rediffmail.com » Tue Feb 08, 2011 5:38 am

I am a social activist working on gender and sexuality issues for past 2 decades through the organization Men Against Violence & Abuse (MAVA) engaging men to stop and prevent gender-based violence against women. Details about my pioneering work can be had on www.mavaindia.org

Gender-based violence against women is both a human rights as well as a public health concern, associated with serious consequences for women’s health. (I was saddened that 'Better Preventive & Curative Health Care' is listed last in the strategy challenges and among the questions posed before viewers, there is no direct question on Addressing Violence Against Women! .... All my earlier attempts to have a personal interaction and sharing, on my innovative work,with Planning Commission members have failed! Would still hope for a positive response...)

Over the years, gender issues – including gender-based violence against women have been seen largely as ‘‘women’s issues’’ by women’s organizations, other developmental activists and governmental bodies. In India, traditional efforts to tackle gender-based violence against women have concentrated on empowering women to assert themselves and prevent violence. This approach totally isolates and insulates men from the process of transformation and keeps them embedded in their patriarchal mould. Patriarchy, apart from disadvantaging women, brings with it a set of behavioral norms and responsibilities that hinders men from expressing their fears, problems and vulnerabilities.

Men, often become violent, aggressive, and uncaring due to patriarchal modes of socialization that moulds their psyche. Images of masculinity in society are linked to being strong and violent, and to notions that men with ‘power’ are ‘real men’.

The situation necessitates efforts that address how men can analyze perceptions of masculinity and create appropriate alternatives. There is a woeful dearth of safe platforms to talk about problems that give rise to violent behavior, including those relating to issues of gender and sexuality. There is also an equal need for positive role models among men, who assert a gender-sensitive society and can engage young men in the discourse.

While the importance of changing norms and attitudes relating to masculinity is widely accepted, there have been few sustained efforts at changing these norms. There is an urgent need to challenge perceptions of dominant forms of masculinity in men at a young age.

Gender-based violence is a wider social issue that affects not only women’s health ((physical, mental, sexual and reproductive) and well-being, it also affects men’s health and sexuality, relationships, their self-esteem and the ability to channelize their potential.

Thus, to address the root cause of the problem, focused, long-term efforts promoting men’s involvement (simultaneously with women’s empowerment) are required at various levels. Men have to be involved not as supporters (or do-gooders) but as ‘partners’ and ‘stakeholders.’ And they would be seriously involved only if they are convinced that the problem affects them equally, that it is a problem of both the genders.

While men have been earlier involved actively in numerous programs for women’s empowerment across India (in fact, women’s movement in the state was boosted by efforts of men like Mahatma Jotiba Phule and R.D.Karve), there were no platforms to examine ‘gender issues’ as equally ‘men’s issues’. Much before bodies like UN emphasized the need for men’s involvement to improve women’s reproductive health in 1994 (Meet at Cairo), Men Against Violence and Abuse (MAVA) in India had initiated a thought process in 1991 among men to go into the root cause of gender-based violence and has been promoting direct intervention programs involving men in the community, to be ‘part of the solution’ (Men seen largely by others concerned as merely ‘part of the problem’).

For the past 4 years, MAVA has been closely, passionately working with a sizeable number of male youths (of 17 to 20 years) in 4 districts - Pune, Mumbai, Satara and Kolhapur in Maharashtra -- on issues surrounding masculinity, sexual health and gender-sensitive behavior.

The target group was specially chosen at this initiative as it is a vital un-reached population. Impressionable young minds, world over, are more receptive to questioning and attempting to change their attitudes (vis-à-vis men of older age-group). And focused, long-term efforts reaching out to this target group would help significantly in preventing gender-based violence.

While my work has been recognized internationally through 2 prestigious awards: Ashoka Changemakers (US) and Maharashtra Foundation (US), I have yet to come across encouraging response from the Government.

I wish and hope to get positive response from the concerned in near future..

For this message the author harsh267@rediffmail.com has received Like:
anu.shini@gmail.com (Sat Sep 24, 2011 6:23 pm)
Rating: 4%
 
harsh267@rediffmail.com
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Feb 08, 2011 5:23 am
Has Liked: 0 time
Have Like: 1 time

Re: How to ensure that the most vulnerable groups are included with health, women and child care interventions?

Postby anurag181078@gmail.com » Tue Feb 08, 2011 5:38 am

There is need to introduces some index card/score system to ensure the such type of group. This will have the advantages of true selection and coverage instead following any documentation such as ration Card or BPL card etc.

Anurag Gupta
+91-9212666657
anurag181078@gmail.com
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Feb 08, 2011 5:25 am
Has Liked: 0 time
Have Like: 0 time

Re: How to ensure that the most vulnerable groups are included with health, women and child care interventions?

Postby harsh267@rediffmail.com » Tue Feb 08, 2011 10:15 am

Hi! I am a social activist working on gender and sexuality issues for past 2 decades through the organization Men Against Violence & Abuse (MAVA) engaging men to stop and prevent gender-based violence against women. Details about my pioneering work can be had on www.mavaindia.org

Gender-based violence against women is both a human rights as well as a public health concern, associated with serious consequences for women’s health. (I was saddened that 'Better Preventive & Curative Health Care' is listed last in the strategy challenges and among the questions posed before viewers, there is no direct question on Addressing Violence Against Women! .... All my earlier attempts to have a personal interaction and sharing, on my innovative work,with Planning Commission members have failed! Would still hope for a positive response...)

Over the years, gender issues – including gender-based violence against women have been seen largely as ‘‘women’s issues’’ by women’s organizations, other developmental activists and governmental bodies. In India, traditional efforts to tackle gender-based violence against women have concentrated on empowering women to assert themselves and prevent violence. This approach totally isolates and insulates men from the process of transformation and keeps them embedded in their patriarchal mould. Patriarchy, apart from disadvantaging women, brings with it a set of behavioral norms and responsibilities that hinders men from expressing their fears, problems and vulnerabilities.

Men, often become violent, aggressive, and uncaring due to patriarchal modes of socialization that moulds their psyche. Images of masculinity in society are linked to being strong and violent, and to notions that men with ‘power’ are ‘real men’.

The situation necessitates efforts that address how men can analyze perceptions of masculinity and create appropriate alternatives. There is a woeful dearth of safe platforms to talk about problems that give rise to violent behavior, including those relating to issues of gender and sexuality. There is also an equal need for positive role models among men, who assert a gender-sensitive society and can engage young men in the discourse.

While the importance of changing norms and attitudes relating to masculinity is widely accepted, there have been few sustained efforts at changing these norms. There is an urgent need to challenge perceptions of dominant forms of masculinity in men at a young age.

Gender-based violence is a wider social issue that affects not only women’s health ((physical, mental, sexual and reproductive) and well-being, it also affects men’s health and sexuality, relationships, their self-esteem and the ability to channelize their potential.

Thus, to address the root cause of the problem, focused, long-term efforts promoting men’s involvement (simultaneously with women’s empowerment) are required at various levels. Men have to be involved not as supporters (or do-gooders) but as ‘partners’ and ‘stakeholders.’ And they would be seriously involved only if they are convinced that the problem affects them equally, that it is a problem of both the genders.

While men have been earlier involved actively in numerous programs for women’s empowerment across India (in fact, women’s movement in the state was boosted by efforts of men like Mahatma Jotiba Phule and R.D.Karve), there were no platforms to examine ‘gender issues’ as equally ‘men’s issues’. Much before bodies like UN emphasized the need for men’s involvement to improve women’s reproductive health in 1994 (Meet at Cairo), Men Against Violence and Abuse (MAVA) in India had initiated a thought process in 1991 among men to go into the root cause of gender-based violence and has been promoting direct intervention programs involving men in the community, to be ‘part of the solution’ (Men seen largely by others concerned as merely ‘part of the problem’).

For the past 4 years, MAVA has been closely, passionately working with a sizeable number of male youths (of 17 to 20 years) in 4 districts - Pune, Mumbai, Satara and Kolhapur in Maharashtra -- on issues surrounding masculinity, sexual health and gender-sensitive behavior.

The target group was specially chosen at this initiative as it is a vital un-reached population. Impressionable young minds, world over, are more receptive to questioning and attempting to change their attitudes (vis-à-vis men of older age-group). And focused, long-term efforts reaching out to this target group would help significantly in preventing gender-based violence.

While my work has been recognized internationally through 2 prestigious awards: Ashoka Changemakers (US) and Maharashtra Foundation (US), I have yet to come across encouraging response from the Government.

I wish and hope to get positive response from the concerned in near future..

Harish
harsh267@rediffmail.com
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Feb 08, 2011 5:23 am
Has Liked: 0 time
Have Like: 1 time

Re: How to ensure that the most vulnerable groups are included with health, women and child care interventions?

Postby abmehta66@yahoo.co.in » Thu Feb 10, 2011 3:50 pm

I am involved with the welfare of senior citizens being the vice president of Senior Citizens Forum, Bhopal. For senior citizens who have no coverage under insurance schemes the biggest problem is getting timely and the required health-care near their place of residence. We have been organising medical camps with the help of doctors volunteering. The response in villages around Bhopal has been good. The biggest obstacles are not knowing the facilities available or not being able to easily reach the place/town where it is available. Neglect by of-springs adds to their voes. (They are reluctant to take Legal recourse). NGOs can do a bit if they are not after just publicity. Municipal authorities are inefficient and corrupt by and large. (One has to pay even for birth or death certificates if takes place at home). Is it practical to have hospitals tailored to the needs of senior citizens where they can register for life?
abmehta66@yahoo.co.in
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2011 4:08 am
Has Liked: 0 time
Have Like: 0 time

Re: How to ensure that the most vulnerable groups are included with health, women and child care interventions?

Postby drvinayaksonawane@gmail.com » Fri Feb 11, 2011 7:16 am

Being involved at ground activites in prevention and curative services, we provide intervetnion for Anemia and malnutrition in preschool children in slums of mumbai...
we have effective data to show the impact of the activity for these vulnerable children...

strategy we adopted is to focus on adolescents for family life education covering adolescent changes, nutrition, addiction, puberty, anemia, gender sensitization, HIV/AIDS and so for these vulnerable children in slums of mumbai.
so more important id to collaborate with NGO at such ground level work as they are well skilled and having manpower at ground level work. Govt should provide funds alongwith infrastructur with referel syastem.

Impact evaluation and data presentation should be carried out every quarterly for such NGO's and case presenations will help.
this can ensure the intervention activities carried out for the marginalised communities...

as we see, govt and civic bodies are present near to work area but people not walking for the benefits so such partnerships will play dramatic role...
drvinayaksonawane@gmail.com
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Feb 11, 2011 6:58 am
Has Liked: 0 time
Have Like: 0 time

Re: How to ensure that the most vulnerable groups are included with health, women and child care interventions?

Postby sss@sdlindia.com » Tue Mar 22, 2011 10:27 am

• If it is ensured that health care is delivered to every village then it covers all persons vulnerable or not
• However for all village groups there should be a group leader who should be entrusted with responsibility of the vulnerable persons
• As far as lonely unsupported individuals are concerned there should be some enrollment mechanism. The staff on mobile units should personally visit such persons and provide whatever health care that is required or arrange to shift them to nearby state run hospital where appropriate AHUSH or modern treatment can be provided.
Local NGOs should be provided funds to act as village stewards who would coordinate with the relevant government depts.
sss@sdlindia.com
 
Posts: 41
Joined: Fri Feb 25, 2011 5:50 am
Has Liked: 0 time
Have Like: 3 times

Re: How to ensure that the most vulnerable groups are included with health, women and child care interventions?

Postby dave6166@gmail.com » Wed Jul 20, 2011 10:17 pm

dave6166@gmail.com
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2011 10:10 pm
Has Liked: 0 time
Have Like: 0 time

Re: How to ensure that the most vulnerable groups are included with health, women and child care interventions?

Postby anu.shini@gmail.com » Sat Sep 24, 2011 8:00 pm

Once I was talking to a friend who was working as a medical officer in a PHC in some remote tribal area. He described his PHC 'building'; it has one single room with a table and a few benches, few drugs and no toilet; my friend was supposed to run that PHC round the clock!!!

This is also the case with many of our PHCs. How can the medical staff do any work in such conditions? This obviously results in absenteeism and all the work is done/schemes implemented only on paper.

Providing the physical infrastructure is the first thing to do. We dig mines, build roads, dams and even resorts in the deep forests for the sake of ourselves (urban dwellers) but don't build a proper hospital for those living in such forests.

The real problem is our apathy, lack of sensitivity and of course corruption. We have to tackle these things if we really wish any such 'inclusion' to happen.

The members of these so called vulnerable groups are the only ones (apart from a few sincere public servants and NGOs) who will be really interested in solving their problems. We need to assist them to help themselves. In other words it's all about decentralization of decision making and empowerment of all such vulnerable groups.

Regarding 'inclusion' in health care, we can think about training a few volunteering individuals from among men and women of such groups in identifying the signs and symptoms of common diseases and giving some basic treatment. For example we can handle a few Paracetamol strips to them after explaining the usage and adverse effects and ask them to give those tablets when they notice high temperature then take the patient to the PHCs/doctors. These volunteers are in addition to the local health care workers (ANMs etc.).

That way we can improve the access, build trust and encourage them to seek institutionalized health care services.

It should be made compulsory for the medicos to attend PHCs, work in camps or mobile units as part of their courses. Besides providing treatment to the people it helps sensitizing the future doctors towards the needs of the most vulnerable groups.

Learning the regional language should be a must for the medicos/doctors working in an area (many of the doctors fail to understand what exactly the illiterate patients are complaining about and also fail to explain them about their disease/treatment in their language). They also should have knowledge about the traditional practices, taboos prevailing in those regions.

Sadly, our current medical education system is making doctors for the sake of US and UK but not for India and it's poor.
anu.shini@gmail.com
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Feb 04, 2011 7:05 am
Has Liked: 1 time
Have Like: 3 times


cron